Curtiss SOC-3 Seagull - Hasegawa 1/72

Hi everyone,
I’m starting to assemble this Hasegawa kit:


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr

to make this aircraft:


VO-5 USS New York (BB-34) Source: Naval History and Heritage Command

The Curtiss SOC Seagull was a biplane scout-observation aircraft that operated from US battleships and cruisers throughout the Second World War and was designed as a replacement for the Vought 02U. Each battleship carried three SOC’s for the primary purpose of spotting long range of its 14-inch guns.
All cruiser carried four planes units and these were primarily for scouting.
All models of the SOC were convertible from floatplanes to landsplanes and operated on wheels from naval air stations ashore when their parent ship was in port.

The Seagull was used to support several shore bombardments, including Operation Torch, the invasion of Sicily and the Salerno landings. During these operations it proved to be very vulnerable to enemy fighter aircraft.
The Seagull was in use on US cruisers during the battle of the Coral Sea (4-8 May 1942), at the battle of Midway of June 1942, and on the fleet that supported the invasion of Gaudalcanal and Tulagi in August 1942. At Midway twenty-eight Seagulls equipped Cruiser Scouting Squadrons 4, 5 and 6 (VCS-4, VCS-5 and VCS-6). During the Guadalcanal campaign Seagulls were used to try and find the Japanese ships ferrying reinforcements to the island at night (the Tokyo Express), with at least one being shot down.

A quick look inside the box:


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr
VO-4, Battleship USS Colorado (Land Plane Version)


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr
VO-5. Battleship USS New York (Seaplane Version)


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr

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Neat, I stumbled into the land based version. Love to see how this ones goes. :wave:

2 Likes

I managed to buy this little gem to detailing the engine:


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr

but I couldn’t buy the Starfighter resin cockpit interior and so I tried to detail the cockpit, what do you think about it?


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr

2 Likes

Here is the Soc-3 Seagull seaplane embarked on the USS New York …


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr

I applied a coat of black primer before painting it


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr

3 Likes

Looking good. Are those the kit braces on the float or did you substitute brass rod? And how did you get the wing struts aligned? :wave:

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Just an observation which, while irrelevant to this build, may be of use to readers contemplating a similar model. On those pre-war U.S. cruisers with two catapults (one on each side amidships on a tower and stowed parallel too, and approximately level with, the outer side of the deck) in port the aircraft carried on the catapults would have the outboard wings folded back while those inboard would be fully extended. An odd-looking but interesting way of displaying the Seagull if a catapult were available, as it is in some Japanese seaplane kit releases.

Regards,

M

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Hi Mark,
the braces aren’t inside the kit, I had to add the brass rod to the float.
To maintain the wing structure perpendicular, I used fast cyano glue.

Regards

2 Likes

Hi Tom,
here some interesting images of the Seagulls on catapults:

Source: USN Aircraft--Curtiss SOC Scout-Observation Floatplanes -- On Board Ship (Part I)

4 Likes

That fifth photo (of the USS Indianapolis) illustrates exactly what I was trying to describe. Thanks!

Regards,

M

1 Like


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr

10 Likes

Looks good, what’s your secret for an aluminum finish?

Plane before weathering, rigging and … a sea of resin


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr

8 Likes
  • A good sanding
  • A layer of Mr Surfacer 1500 thinned with Nitro (70% Nitro 30% Mr Surfacer)
  • Eventually another putting and sanding to correct some imperfection
  • Two thin layers of metallic paint (I’m using the Ak Xtreme Metal).

Thanks, just need a couple of translations. Mr. Surfacer 1500; black or gray? Nitro, I suspect that that’s called lacquer thinner in the US, or did you use something else?
It’s a beautiful finish, I hope mine comes out 1/3 as well

Mr surfacer is Black …

In Italy the “Diluente per Nitro” it is used as thinner for the car paint and in scale model is an inexpensive thinner (2$ /Lt.) for all acrylics paint (Tamiya, Gunze)…
in English I think it is “nitro thinner” or Laquer Thinner, but the chemical composition is different from, for example, the tamiya laquer thinner

I found The AK Nitro Thinner but is very very expensive …

I found some examples in the USA Market, i hope they are useful for you :wink:

In italy

Nitro in usa 1

Nitro in USA 2

Bellissimo.
I hope you don’t weather this to much.

Thanks, I just wanted to be sure, language barriers and all. Most stores around here would not react well if I went in and asked for Nitro. :exploding_head: Lacquer thinner will get an entirely different response. :wave:

Brilliant work Rodolfo! Really nice finish on that aeroplane. I don’t think I have ever seen one of these built before, so a very pleasant surprise to see.

Looking forward to your next project.

The Land Plane Version (VO-4, Battleship USS Colorado), is also ready for Weathering and rigging …


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr

5 Likes

Rigging a 1/72 plane is a challenging task for my hands … :wink:


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr


by Rodolfo Masti, on Flickr

6 Likes