Djiti New Figures | Armorama™

Djiti has two new figures of WWII British Soldier in desert and IDF soldier playing violin


This is partial text from the full article (usually with photos) at https://armorama.com/news/djiti-new-figures
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Is it just me or the first figure (British desert) looks cartoonish?

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Tommy’s leggings seem a bit droopy. The two ammo pouches look undersized.
Also… what I learned from the movie “Darkest Hour” is he’s flashing the “up your bum” sign… not the “victory” sign. Of course that could be totally intentional.

Beautiful figure. I don’t see it as cartoonish really but lots of character. Great facial expression.

Quite right & argument still rages about the origin of the 2-finger sign (equivalent to the middle finger), I believe the theory that it goes back to Crecy & Agincourt has been recently debunked. It sounded plausible, English archers captured by the French had those two fingers cut off to prevent them inflicting further casualties, so this was the archers’ sign to show they were ready to cause further mayhem, and also to generally go forth & multiply. I think it was debunked because the French (and English) had a far more terminal method of dealing with prisoners.

Churchill frequently got confused about the above (palm facing inwards) offensive gesture – there are still multiple newsreels that survive of him showing thus. Strenuous efforts were made during WW2 to show him only using the “V for Victory” version in photos, palm facing outwards. However there are some newsreels of Desert Rats in particular using the offensive version & grinning mischievously.

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Whilst I appreciate the animation of the British 8th Army character, I feel that there is just too much adrift for me to be interested in any purchase, even where I the most ardent fan of WW2 figures. As already identified, the ammo pouches are way too small and poorly positioned. The remainder of the '37 pat webbing is all over the place and simply inaccurate. The Small Pack and its fittings are a travesty.

The water bottle is on the wrong side and really should be on the right hip; the bayonet scabbard being on the left. Whilst there might be scope for some individual re-arranging of the personal equipment, in my experience that is unlikely. One adjusts to the military way of doing things, not the other way around.

Lastly the anklets (gaiters) do indeed look a bit crumpled, even given the lowering of quality of manufacture during the war years, but there is evidence that they could indeed, look pretty ropey.

As I say, I like the pose, but the apparent refusal of manufacturers to research British ’37 equipment sufficiently is beyond me; there’s more than enough books or websites to get this sort of thing right, and sometimes I just despair. It’s even cheap enough to purchase (although admittedly, one would have to know how to assemble it correctly). A shame in this case, as I find Djiti figures normally pretty good.

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Postscript: 'Just found this - presumably the inspiration:

image

It would have been nice to have seen the full figure; perhpas he was wearing his kit as Djiti have modelled it!

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Not knowing nearly as much as you Brian about British kit from WW2, it seems this is a recurring problem with figure manufacturers when it comes to British kit, they seem to get many basic things wrong.

Well they do indeed Richard; I don’t really know why when they appear to research - and accomplish - so much else.

Mind you, I’m probably in danger of coming across like a One Trick Pony (though I like to think I am also well-versed in the intricacies of both '44 Pat and '58 Pat webbing).

In extremis, I might just have to purchase a set and produce a tutorial!

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Is it me or is British solider’s left ankle bending in an unnatural spot?

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It does look to be at the extreme range of motion for an ankle- pulling one’s toes up towards the shin- but other than that if looks ok.

No, I think you have a point Brian- I believe I’ve said that before too. Reference material both in paper and online is not that hard to come-by either so I too wonder why companies keep missing the target in terms of accuracy.

I have to also say though, if the figure is an interesting one (like this one) I would, personally, overlook the problems and/or have a crack at correcting them if I was feeling like it.

I must admit Karl, that even though I’m not a WW2 buff, I rather fancy the idea of taking this model and modifying it to bring it up to scratch - it wouldn’t take much, although I find working in resin a bit tricky.

I do love the pose, redolent of all the innate contempt the carnaptious British squaddie has for just about most things, even those on his own side, yet will (usually) be relied upon to fight like a bastard until the job is done.

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Yeah the pose is very iconic- reminds me of an old Verlinden bust with a similar pose.

I’d probably buy this figure because I love the pose, but could replace the ammo pouches and move the canteen if possible to the right side. The back pack can be modified if necessary but other than that I like it very much.
Most of the time, the details seem to be correct on US or German figures which is frustrating that they can’t pay more attention to details for British or common wealth figures……

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The only real issue I have had with this company is that the feet nearly always look way too big

They’ve had some issues in the past with proportions of things like arms etc. I have a set or two that are a little off.