Egyptian ASU-57

I’d go box stock on AER and balls out on on the HB, just to show the difference.

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I wholeheartedly agree with @18bravo

I’m inclined to agree, but the Eduard set is made for the AER kits and I’m not sure if the parts would fit. I was looking for a quick build for an upcoming show on March 23. Hmmmm

The life as a model builder is tough.
We risk injury.
We face tough decisions.
We receive comments that our builds are wrong in some way or another.
Others see us as strange nerds, possibly with an unhealthy interest for war, death and destruction …
Sigh …
It’s a tough life …

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I know…. these executive decisions are nerve wracking lol

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I prefer the term geek thank you!!

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Ah, but our surroundings don’t care about what we prefer or not :wink:

Once upon a time in the previous millenium I was sent to San Francisco by my company to attend some seminar for two days.
I took the opportunity to check out the local hobby shops.
A colleague asked my what I had done in Frisco other than the seminar.
When I told her I had visited the local model shops she gave me a very strange look …

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I would have done the same thing lol. I would have looked at my new model or reference book over a beer and a slice of pizza.

I did find this book:
https://www.amazon.se/-/en/Fred-Crismon/dp/087938672X
at a Barnes & Noble shop near Union Square.
The hotel was very near Union Square and I didn’t carry that heavy book far.
It was in 1998 so either they have moved or my memory is slipping …

Strangely enough, despite its martial focus, not many serving soldiers admitted to being modellers, or certainly not in my day; any such preoccupation or parallel pursuits (wargaming) was seen as decidedly childlike and therefore un-macho if there’s such a word.

I was often bemused, when even some gnarly old warriors “came-out” and confessed their sins(!) but even then it was often dressed up as “Well, it helps with equipment recognition”; up to a point it does, as long as one is modelling current stuff. The chances of needing to identify a Tiger I back in 1973 were pretty remote I feel.

I put the hobby on hold for most of my career not due to peer pressure, but simply as the hobby doesn’t travel well - all that fragile plastic - and I was on the move roughly every 2-3 years or so, and sometimes more often when 6 month tours or loan service reared their ugly head; and as a single man, the barrack environment was never going to be that conducive to the hobby.

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Brian, in all my years in the military, I only built two models while on active duty. The first one was in Germany in 85 or 86. I went downtown Erlangen I search of hobby shops one Saturday afternoon. I found one and bought a Tamiya Leopard 1. I took it back to my room and built it that weekend and the following weekend I hand painted. If looked horrible but I had a blast doing it. Strangely, I didn’t face any ridicule at all from anyone. Most guys were impressed. There was one other guy in my unit who built models and he was a corporal who lived on the third floor of our building and used to build figures and make ponchos out of white glue and tissue paper. It came excellent. The other time was in Iraq in 06 I built a Tamiya 88mm gun. Painted when I got home and it’s still sitting in the American AirPower Museum in Farmingdale, New York.

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Well Richard, all I can deduce is that your comrades were far more forgiving than the carnaptious souls I, all too often, encountered!

Funnily enough, that ancient Tamiya Leopard was I think the first 1:35 model I ever built.

I also recall that phenomena that whenever models were presented - particularly in the Intelligence Sections I often worked on the periphery of, or even within the dedicated training wings in the larger HQs I frequented, there was never any sneering, just rapt fascination; it was in the barrack room that the more ruthless put-downs prevailed, that and the fact that a reeling 16 stone drunk crashing around, looking for prey and careering into lockers etc was all too often the norm on Friday and Saturday nights.

I always kept the model in my wall locker on the top shelf- with the locker locked in case my self or the other guys happened by in a drunken stupor, something we did very often!

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And you’re right- modeling definitely helped me in vehicle recognition. I knew most of the cards in the deck before I even got in the Army.

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Ok finally some progress. I decided to not use aftermarket stuff on this one. I painted the suspension and lower hull. I still have to assemble the tracks then get them painted.


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“Danger Modeling”

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Sorry I haven’t posted any progress on this thing lately but here it is:













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Well, you’ve turned that around Matthew - well done you; those tracks alone would deter me - and have.

'Looking very much the business!

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As I’m sure most modelers know, this is an old kit that came out under several brand names. I think it was produced in 1995 or so. The quality is mediocre at best, poor in many areas but it does build up into a nice little model I’d say. I did enjoy it very much despite its problems. The kit reminds me of 70s Tamiya kits. Many parts are poorly molded, lots of flash, a few short shot parts and poor fit. The tracks are the worst as far as accuracy but go together quite easy. I have two other kits of this model besides the AER one you see here; one from Toga and the other the Hobby Boss kit which is light years ahead. I had to use a few pieces from the Toga kit because the ones in the AER kit were broken. This is a “What if “ project because I have no evidence whatsoever that the Egyptians used it at all but I went with it anyway.
The kit didn’t come with clear head light lenses so I found two ( dissimilar sizes I might add) from my parts box. They don’t look good but that’s all I had. O made my share of mistakes on this kit, I didn’t do particularly well with the track fit- that’s on me because they give you plenty of extras. You’ll notice some gaps on the left side tracks. Sloppy on my part. I also took two gears from the final drive assembly from my Panzer IV E from Dragon and used them for the hub caps on the drive sprockets since none were provided. I added the springs for the rear mud flaps from rod and also the mud flaps themselves were cut off the back plate because they didn’t match up with the fenders so I made my own. The road wheels are too wide to fit between the guide horns on the tracks so I had to shave them down from behind. I also made a canvas tarp for the gun manlet from epoxy sculpt, it came ok. I still have to sand it and many make some more wrinkles. I used the headlight guards from the Edward PE set , the kit ones were garbage and broken as well. Lastly, I’m using an Egyptian tank crew figure from Warriors, but I modified his right arm a little to have it leaning on the vehicle inside. I used Tamiya paints, AK enamel dark brown washes and a little oil paint brushing.
Comments welcome!

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Oh just a few other things I forgot- Yes the gun is a bit crooked if you look at it from inside the vehicle, I painted the muffler with Life Miniatures rust set, still have to add an antenna and paint a few more details and touch up, and of course the figure.

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