Help needed with Flowers - Flower Class Corvette questions

DO NOT use HMS Pansy; the RN nearly did but fortunately opted for an alternative name for that flower, Heartsease… K15 also served in the US Navy as USS Courage. The USN reciprocated by lending the RN a minesweeper which served as HMS Fairy.

Cheers,

M

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I converted Revell’s 1/144 Snowberry into HMCS Wetaskiwin ("Wet-Ass Queen), which became more of a scratch-build project, considering the amount of work. The original Snowberry model had a rounded stern, and Wetaskiwin had the flat stern. I assembled the hull-halves then heated it over a light until the plastic became soft. Then I just pressed it down onto the table top until suitably flat. Required some sanding and finishing, but turned out fine.
:smiley: :canada:

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:man_facepalming:
Well, in 1/144 scale it doesn’t make much of a difference.
That method does not work in 1/72.
The angle of the stern was not changed (same hull length)

  1. Upper edge of bulwark for square stern
  2. Edge of deck for square stern
  3. Upper edge of bulwark for round stern
  4. Edge of deck for round stern
  5. Stern at centreline where both stern types have the same profile.
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That made me chuckle Tom, maybe I could call it ‘Nosegay’ (a small bunch of flowers, typically one that is sweet-scented), :wink:.

G, :beer:

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LOL! But if you were wanting a fictional Flower I was going to suggest the most famous of all, HMS Compass Rose. Portrayed in the movie “The Cruel Sea” by the former HMS Coreopsis, Pennant Number K32 (but for the movie wearing K49, which had been that of HMS Crocus). The problem is the subject has been done to death with so much material available; I’ve even seen pictures of a Matchbox (Revell) glue bomb repurposed as the wreck of Compass Rose, Titanic style! What some seem to forget is apart from (probably) a new coat of paint for the movie, all the reference material will apply to the real Coreopsis.
A bigger problem was Coreopsis was originally fitted for minesweeping, but if you can get past the stern issue…

Cheers,

M

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Hi all,

Another question, :thinking:

As mentioned in the main build log, I’m hoping to model a number of the vessels doors in the open position.

Below is an image that might help explain my question.

The first door I’ve removed is to the rear of the long, low structure towards the stern of the ship. On a number of plan drawings I’ve seen, it lists this door as being watertight.

The moulded-on door is very simplified (see bottom right above), just two hinges and, what appears to be some type of a lever handle. The Anatomy of the Ship book relating to the Flower Class Corvette Agassiz has a diagram of a watertight door (see top left above), but I’m struggling to find a close-up of how it would look externally, also it doesn’t appear to have a lever handle internally, :thinking:?

Would it be a standard door, if so does anyone have any good images of what it would look like from both sides, and would such a door be operated by a single handle, :thinking:.

I hope the above makes sense, :thinking:, and someone can help me, :slightly_smiling_face:.

Cheers, :beer:,

G

Here’s a similar (?) door on the Sackville

Don’t know if this one is supposed to be watertight…

H.P.

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Thanks again H.P., you’re a star, :+1: :slightly_smiling_face:.

G, :beer:

So each dog has to be closed individually? There is no handwheel and cam to close them all at once?
:smiley: :canada:

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I don’t know if this applies to your build, but when I made my conversion of Snowberry to Wetaskwin, I found out (too late) that the bridge doors were sliding doors, sliding aft, rather than the hinged doors that I represented.
:smiley: :canada:

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It is a watertight door when all dogs are battened down. During action stations and high sea states all dogs are down. While along side, low sea state and cruising more than likely only one dog would be used.

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  1. Rubber seal/gasket, the dogs (latches) forces this seal/gasket against the
  2. raised metal edge, the dogs engage behind (inside) of this frame

Woof, woof
image

Simpler door with only four dogs

Random images of dogged doors (lots of different styles)

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Thanks to Leo, Barney and Robin for their help and comments, very useful information as always, :+1: :slightly_smiling_face:.

G, :beer:

Indeed. Much like a Gato submarine, or I suspect most vessels in any Navy. Choose one that’s the closest to what you want and have fun making those changes.

Why not?

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In the UK ‘pansy’ is a rather derogatory term for someone likely to wave this flag

" But the pansy was also notably used throughout the 20th century as a somewhat derogatory term for homosexual men. Along with buttercup, daisy, and other flowery language (including the somewhat nonspecific ‘horticultural lad’), pansy was a term used to refer to gay men, suggesting them to be non-masculine and delicate."

Edit: Some more trivia

HMS Pansy (HMS Heartsease)

“A Flower Class Corvette built during the Second World War for convoy escort. The name was changed to HMS Heartsease shortly before commissioning. The story goes that the crew nearly mutinied at the prospect of having “Pansy” written on their caps… Heartsease rescued 31 survivors from the Norwegian Merchant Simla and 9 survivors from the British Merchant Thistlegarth after they were sunk by German U-Boats.”

I don’t know which is worse, HMS Pansy or USS Hoe …

HMS Fairy and HMS Sappho could also raise a few eybrows

Some more funny stuff over here:
https://www.reddit.com/r/Warships/comments/3bh5ze/a_humorous_read_about_rn_ship_names/
"Having started with HMS Pansy, HMS Fairy and HMS Spanker, he moved into ----------- suggestive names - HMS Teaser, HMS Tickler, HMS Torrid, HMS Thruster and HMS Thrasher. "

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It is worth noting that before the term “Gay” was subverted by the “Alphabet Soup” Group (the one which has run out of letters in the alphabet and has substituted the “+” sign) the Royal Navy had an entire class of fast patrol boats where “Gay” was used as a prefix for a military specialisation as the name of the craft, e.g. HMS Gay Charger was commanded by Nigel Lawson (later Margaret Thatcher’s Chancellor of the Exchequer and father of -amongst others- celebrity chef Nigella) during his National Service. The author of “The Cruel Sea” , Nicholas Monsarrat (mentioned earlier in this thread) also wrote “The Ship That Died of Shame” which was similarly filmed, the fictional MGB being portrayed (some might say appropriately enough) by HMS Gay Dragoon
After a singularly unfortunate career, the first of the class, HMS Gay Archer was sold out of service and over the past two decades has been privately restored.

Not part of the class but preceding them in WW2 service were HMS Gay Viking and HMS Gay Corsair, originally MGBs building for the Turkish Navy but taken over by the RN at the start of the war. They, along with three others of the eight-strong class, were converted to high-speed blockade runners, running the Skagerrak under the Red Ensign of the Merchant Navy and with civilian crews to collect strategic materials from Sweden. They never operated as MGBs under those names, so please no jokes about “putting the willies up the enemy”…

Regards,

M

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Once upon a time I worked in crystal/glass shop, the boss’es wifes name was Gaye,
surname Haffajee. He was just Joe, dressed like he came straight from the garden.
When he didn’t feel like talking to a customer he claimed that he was just the janitor
and directed them to the manager (Gaye).
Very classy lady.
We got a lot of US tourists, the wives were shopping and their husbands were tired.
We had two comfortable chairs with a TV playing a videotape with a song and dance show.
The men would look longingly at those chairs, Joe invited them to sit and offered tea or coffee.
After a while he asked them if they liked the ladies singing and dancing.
When they said yes he told them it was a dragshow. Funny every dang time :rofl:

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