Help please,

Hi all,

I’m in the process of trying to create a dockside scene for a Railway group build/campaign. The scale is 00/H0, and the ‘footprint’ of the scene is A4, however, I have to admit to being neither a Railway, nor a Maritime builder, and have little knowledge of either, so am seeking advice/help, :thinking:.

To set the scene, the diorama is of a fictitious small quayside in the south of England during WW2, it’s early days but I have attached below a few ‘progress’ images to give an idea of the size and scope.

Out of interest the above is generally constructed from foam, foamboard, card and and DAS, with all the stonework and cobbles individually scribed by hand into the DAS after it has dried. The painting is a tad rough at the moment, it’s just the base colours being set down, :roll_eyes:.

I would like to add some interesting features that might have been found on a small quayside of the 1940s, e.g. types of fittings and fixtures, also I’m convinced I’ve seen a picture, somewhere, of metal tie-bars holding the coping stones together, see diagram below…

Am I imagining this, :thinking: :roll_eyes:? If not, would they be applied to every stone, and roughly what size would they have been?

If anyone can help me with any advice/links/suggestions it would be much appreciated, :+1: :slightly_smiling_face:.

Cheers, :beer:,

G

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Hi G-man,

Your work so far looks excellent. I think what you’re looking for are Cleats or Bollards, etc, for securing ships mooring-lines to, when a ship/vessel is tied-up alongside a jetty or quay. If you live anywhere near a harbour, especially one like Portsmouth, take a look at the dock-side fittings. Old photos are also an excellent source for inspiration. You’d also see a certain amount of materials such as rope, barrels and waste containers nearby, but not too much, as the safety people would start having fits. If your diorama is for a wartime setting, with MTB’s, etc, you may also see stores on the jetty, waiting to be brought onboard, or a crew doing just that. I’ll see what I have in the way of photos, and get back to you.

Cheers,

Chris. in Victoria, BC

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You might like this: https://scalescenes.com/product/ly02-canal-wharf-boxfile-layout/
:smiley:

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A bit of moss on the dock side wall … Not a ton though . shipping pallets rigged with netting is also another option.

I can recall flat metal bars like you mention kind of like a giant staple and set into holes in the stones filled with lead.

Keith

Thanks Chris B, Chris P, Keith and Leo for your comments, links, and suggestions, they’re much appreciated, :+1: :slightly_smiling_face:.

When you say ‘moss on the dock side wall’ Chris (B), do you mean along the high tide mark (see dotted red line on image below), or do you mean growing randomly in the cracks between the stonework, :thinking:?

If you do find any suitable photos Chris (P) they’ll be greatly appreciated. As for a suitable boat I’ve been struggling, the ‘wedge’ shaped area that will be water is only 40 (narrowest point) x 65 (widest point) x 130mm long, finding something suitable for WW2 Britain that would fit is proving a struggle, :roll_eyes: :sob:. It has to be a kit (or ready built), I can’t download printable options as I don’t have access to a printer, :unamused:.

I’m glad you’ve seen the ‘staple’ (good description too, :slightly_smiling_face:) Keith, I was beginning to think that I was imagining it, just need to find that picture again, :smile:.

That link is amazing Leo, it’s so well detailed it almost makes creating ones own a waste of time, :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:.

Thanks again to all of you for taking the time to respond, and cheers, :beer:,

G

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One thing I didn’t realize about Scalescenes is that when you pay they send you a pdf file by email for you to print out, cut out, and glue to a suitable backing. So everything is going to be flat - totally 2-dimensional, without any textures, etc. Image quality also depends on your printer - providing you have one. However, since they are cheap, you can print them out and use them as a template for scratch-building with real materials.
:smiley:

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I have seen them in the face of stones too. Glad I stopped you doubting your own sanity though. :slight_smile:

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Shame about them only being 2-dimensional, guess they really are flat-packed buildings, :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:.

But still visually very nice and inspirational, and as you say Leo, they’re a cost effective template for people to follow.

G

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You’ve restored my sanity Keith, least what little there was of it, :slightly_smiling_face:.

G

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Don’t get mw wrong! They do have fully 3 D kits, but all the detail - brick surface and texture, window frames, doors, etc. are printed. Very convincing until viewed really close-up. When (and if) I get a really good printer I will have to try one of their products to use as a template - or just free-hand one from their illustrations!
:smiley:

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Having worked on the Mississippi I can say you may want a small fixed crane like the one we used to swing equipment over onto a push barge. These are some what similar.

image

Edit: Perused some photos of Pearl Harbor I took a few years ago. Condemned WWII era dock.


Cleats - check.
Bollards -check
Interesting looking pumping equipment - check.
Two officers debating where to have lunch - common sight worldwide…

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Yes a small bit of moss randomly is what I meant . As for the tide line a bit of discoloration should work nicely.
The staples often have a slight bow tie shape .
The crane was also one of the items I would suggest . That is available from miniart .
I will try to find some reference images to help

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Here’s an excellent crane: HO Scale Derrick Crane kit
It’s HO scale for model RR, but close enough for 1/72 use.
:smiley:

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Glad you caught that . I dont know why I was thinking 35th

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Thanks for the crane link Leo and 18bravo, I definitely intend to add some sort of crane, trying to see if I can find one that can be positioned so that it can serve both a docked vessel and an adjacent train. Though maybe I should have thought of it right at the beginning as it would have been easier to put the track in a better position, :thinking: :roll_eyes: :slightly_smiling_face:.

Cheers, :beer:,

G

Thanks for the additional information on the shape of the ‘staples’ Chris B, though you had me questioning my sanity again, I knew Miniart did some 1/72nd buildings, but I was damned if I could find a crane, :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:.

Cheers, :beer:,

G

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Although Mini Art’s crane is 1/35 it may actually suit your needs perfectly, as you need one that’ll swing from train to watercraft. Maybe go with finer chain and a small electric motor instead of the handcrank.

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Going through my collection of trackside photos I stumbled across these, which I believe were taken in Hudson New York a stone’s throw from the Half Moon Saloon.
This is exactly the crane I had in mind in my original post, but couldn’t find it at the time.
I had always wanted to scratch build it using old watch gears.



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I really like the look of that crane 18bravo, it looks chunky and purposeful, and whilst scratch build things is way beyond my capabilities it has influenced my choice, so thank you, :+1: :slightly_smiling_face:

I’m going to use the Ratio kit below…

image

Cheers, :beer:,

G

1 Like