How come no 1/35 scale muscle cars?

Thank you to everyone who took the time to respond. Little red hearts for everyone! I am very interested in the ways human beings perceive and compartmentalize things.

I chose to make this thread about muscle cars because, based on my reading, some of you own one, original or modern. In my experience, a lot of guys who like fast motorcycles and fast cars also like armored fighting vehicles. It one likes those things and builds models, it seems logical that there would be a desire to have them all in one scale. Yet, from this small survey, it is not so! Maybe there is a model builder’s equivalent to price fixing–model scale fixing.

I am sure the day will come when everything is available via stereo lithography. As current generations die off and home manufacturing technologies improve, the perceptual boundaries associated with model scale will disappear. I wonder what the scales of choice will be in one hundred years. I wonder if this hobby will even exist in 100 years.

Maybe it would be possible for someone with access to the required equipment to 3D-scan a 1/25th scale muscle car, scale it down and 3D-print the result.
Scan sub-assemblies that are of a suitable size and print larger (and fewer) parts.

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That should work fairly well. Wall thickness might be an issue for some parts.

At this point, high quality 3D models probably exist for almost every modern car and truck. Hollywood film makers use them to render scenes for movies. It requires work to make such a model suitable for 3D printing, but probably less work than starting from scratch.

Everything will end up as a 3D model for printing. Everything. It is only a matter of time.

I thought it might make sense for a current model company to cut molds for a muscle car or fast motorcycle. Based on responses in this thread, maybe not. A handful of 1/35 scale models exist of modern(ish) cars and trucks. Now I wonder how well they sold.

Interesting theory. I’ve long thought that if you like model tanks you probably like model railroading. My only evidence of this is myself and a few friends who like both.

As for your statement, I don’t like fast motorcycles and fast cars. Although I do like modeling fast motorcycles and armoured fighting vehicles. Not many opportunities for both together, unless you’re modeling the tank meets bike scenario I alluded to above. Cars haven’t really done ir for me since I was about twenty.

Then of course the conversation could take a different tangent - I was thinking about this the other day when I mentioned that I know someone has more than once taken one of my clean builds, added to it, and passed it off as his own. I doesn’t bother me one whit. Car “builders” the 1:1 kind, generally take a built car, add new brakes, wheels, exhaust, maybe bigger carbs, taller cams, give it, er, pay for, a cool paint job, and they are “car builders.” I"m not talking about the guys with their own TV shows, Those guys are a whole different breed.
Then you take a bike builder. You’ve got the guy who takes an old CB750, cuts all of the ugliness off of it, add clip ons, rear sets, an LED headlight, maybe some air filter pods. Voila! He’s a bike builder.
The guy who takes a base armor kit, already assembled and painted, but weathers it, adds stowage, maybe some battle damage, maybe swaps out a resin gun mount for a different gun - that’s really not much different.
I’m thinking about this because of the post I read the other day in the “Death of Scratch Building” thread.
I’m doing a lot of conversions right now. Not a lot of scratch building going on though. If I shorten the frame on a truck and turn a 6x6 to a 4x4 well, that might be fun, but it ain’t scratch building. Similarly, I don’t consider swapping parts from one truck to another much of a scratch build either, but I do have a cool project coming up soon (when one of the kits arrives) that I’ll add to a dockside diorama I’m doing. Even so, in the end it’s pretty much a part swap.
Then there are the guys who make their own frames, make their own parts for a bike on a lathe and a mill, hammer out a tank, and weld everything together. I’ve tried to be that guy, but my welding “skills” are not yet solid enough to trust my ass on a 100 mph death machine, which it would surely be.
I imagine if Stickframe built lifesized cars, he’d probsbly fit more into that category. Hell, he’d probably dig up some iron ore, smelt it into steel, and hammer out body panels for his own muscle car.

So while your theory is interesting, I’d be more interested in knowing if model builders take the same approach to model building that they do with real life projects - the bolt on, part swap method, or the all out creation of something truly from scratch. Recognizing of course that unless your name is Burt Munro you don’t have to cast your own pistons from an exotic alloy you created yourself.
Not judging - both methods produce fine results. I’m just curious.

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I will start scratch building when my current stash runs dry.
Promise, scouts honour :grin:

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A 1/35 muscle car is available, but it’s expensive and it’s Batman’s early Batmobile from Bandai.

The seller is Overstock Hobbies with an 88% approval rating so I’d try for a seller with closer to 100% approval rating and pay a bit more for customer satisfaction.

A 1/35 car is pretty small, I would assume, hence modelers prefer 1/25 and 1/24 scale vehicles.

https://www.amazon.com/BANDAI-SPIRITS-Batmobile-Tentative-Plastic/dp/B09G2PLJFF/ref=sr_1_3?crid=37QI3E3D8Q6I1&keywords=1%2F35+bandai&qid=1707598638&sprefix=%2Caps%2C131&sr=8-3

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Early in the Batman timeline or the real one? I think that’s from 2022.

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The remake…“The Batman 2022 film.” This Batman Batmobile was before all the Batman insignias, fins, and all that “Bat stuff” that made Bruce Wayne’s cars look so custom and unique. This is a pure muscle car and as far as I know is the closest 1/35 modern muscle car that you’re going to get in the current model kit market unless 3D printed. And it comes with a “glass” windshield.

https://www.kbb.com/car-news/2022-batmobile-700-horsepower-4-wheel-drive-optional-ev-drivetrain/

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1877830/


Unless you want the 1/35 Bandai Batmobile “Tumbler” which was a military vehicle that Bruce Wayne converted into his Batmobile…two jumps over the river towing bridge cables for the military…hence it can be camouflaged.

https://www.amazon.com/Bandai-Hobby-Maquette-Batmobile-4573102621849/dp/B09G2PS54J/ref=sr_1_2?crid=1N6I8KH0GO4FM&keywords=1%2F35+bandai&qid=1707600459&sprefix=1%2F35+bandai%2Caps%2C160&sr=8-2

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More printable 3D cars…

https://www.cgtrader.com/3d-print-models?author=Andrey-Bezrodny&per_page=120

H.P.

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Heres a idea that might sell both the IDF and the turkish Army both use militarized civilian Jeep Wranglers as staff and command vehcles

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IMG_1059

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That’s why I chose Kadets and Golfs - ubiquitous cars back then in Berlin. And if there was any place you’d see tanks and cars together in an urban setting it was there. I suppose these days we need to include Toyotas.

image

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Sarge, does this mean that we’re thru for the day?

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@18bravo Starting from raw materials and building a machine or model requires a lot of know how, patience, and time. I suspect that, just as most people make fairly minor upgrades to machines, they make fairly minor upgrades to models. For most people, I suspect full on scratch building is well beyond fun.

In my very limited experience, talking with guys in various model clubs, there is some cross over between model and railroad building, but not a lot. My best friend from the various model clubs built model cars and maintained a huge outdoor train layout. All the guys in IPMS were about military stuff with a little sci-fi thrown in. All the guys in the car club were cars with a little sci-fi thrown in. Come to thing of it, I was the only one who dabbled in all of it. The only reason I never built a big train layout was for lack of room. At one point, I purchased over a million LEGO bricks to build a moon base. That also never happened.

@Trisaw Both of those Batmobiles are on my want list. If I recall correctly, the Tim Burtan / Michael Keaton version is also available in 1/35 scale.

@Frenchy Thank you for those links, Frenchy! Since I own a 3D Printer, those are definitely the way to go. Many of them look quite nice. Based on the prices and numbers downloaded, the people making those 3D models are turning a nice profit.

@Stikpusher I love it! Does anyone make 3D models of crushed card? HAHA!

I built one car back in the 2005 to 2010 period. Maybe I will print a 1/35 scale modern sports car and see how it goes.

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Well not exactly muscle cars , but a brand named IMAI once did a small series in 1/35 marketed as rally cars amongs them was the renault 5 Alpine and a VW golf I GTI.

Unfortunatly they are long out of production.

Grz,

Sam.

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I was seconds away from buying one of those VW Golf secondhand at a buy/sell/swap-meet.
Before the WANT-IT part of my brain had convinced the Finance Department
someone else had snatched it. Dang!

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from
https://www.tradera.com/en/item/180901/425992146/byggmodell-imai-vintage-oanvand-inplastad-vw-volkswagen-golf-gti-racing-1-35

Also available from eBay

https://www.ebay.de/itm/375221547839?hash=item575cf2733f:g:I3AAAOSwVT5lt4J1

H.P.

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Despite the amount of WWI vehicles now being produced, there does not appear to be any WWI British motorcycle available in 1/35. As far as cars are concerned, anything from the 70s would be useful to me e.g. Ford Cortina, Austin Maxi etc. The Airfix 1/32 car kits seem fairly compatible with 1/35 figures but most are very scarce and unaffordable.

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https://cults3d.com/en/3d-model/game/ford-cortina-tc-mark-iii-sedan-1970-printable-car-in-separate-parts/similar-designs

H.P.

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