M577 HQ11 of 2d Battalion 47th Infantry (Mechanized) 9th Infantry Division

My plan for the other M577 that I started kitbashing with the AFV Club M113A1 kit is for it to have an interior, the tent set up, and a briefing being conducted.

One way to “fake” that is to build the tent frame and have that set up, but leave the canvass off, as if it hasn’t been set up yet.

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Good idea. Yours looks pretty nice.

I have several other projects in the que before I can start working on the other M577. Hopefully by then Hobby Link will have come out with an interior kit. I remember several years ago there being one in resin from a US Company, but I was encountering a high OPTEMPO at the time and hadn’t yet started building armor kits yet as I am primarily a figure guy, so I missed out on them when they were available.

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The tent extension was usually set up with the frame leaning down at the rear, and the tent was pulled down and over the frame. A more realistic approach may be to have the extension complete and up, and the tent top portion on, and maybe one or more of the sides rolled up to see inside? Call it the brass getting some fresh air or something?

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Just my view, the setup would have been a field set up, so not have been a proper set. In Nan, thyt didn’t stay in place that long. Wayne

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Actually, we used to do that quite a bit, at least in the summer. Those tents get damn hot in the sun. But of course we had to pull the sides down at night.
Ken

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You’d think somebody - Gecko maybe, or Border - would kit up a modern M1068 with interior and tent and everything, to replace the ancient Tamiya M577 kit. Someday!

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I remember how strong the smell of canvas was in those tents.
I don’t think canvas is used anymore.

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Nope, since the mid-late '90s it has been a rubberized/vinyl fabric as part of the SICUP system. It still had a musty smell if rolled up wet and not allowed to dry out.

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That’s good. It’s quite a outdated piece of equipment.

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James,
I would probably go that route with the sides rolled up. I do have a couple of photos from this battalion with the tent portion looking like that.

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That would be nice.

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Thanks, Gino.

Did you scratch build your interior or did you use that resin kit from a company called Iron Brigade or something like that?

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It was all scratch-built. Here are some in-process pics.

https://cs.finescale.com/fsm/modeling_subjects/f/3/t/102527.aspx

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Thanks, Gino.

I book marked it so I can look at it again to use as a reference when the time comes when I start the interior on the second M577.

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I think the idea of the frame set up with the canvas only covering the top and the sides rolled up is a great way to display the CP. Since I’m a “make it work” guy who can’t control myself, the actual frame for my extension is made from aluminum (or aluminium if you prefer) tubes and can be disassembled and stowed on the rack in back of the track over the ramp door opening. Of COURSE that makes no sense but neither does doing a complete interior inside an M-88A1 which is completely enclosed and can’t be seen.

I had thought about making a canvas for the CP, but as you can see, ONE way to display the FDC is to completely leave the roof off the track, so not having the canvas either sort of makes sense.

I’ll probably make a canvas someday, with just the top and the sides rolled up. (If I can only keep myself from trying to incorporate the “light trap” entry door as well as the zipper out openings and screens where one tent connects to another!!!) :joy:


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Wow. Excellent job on the poles. If I you hadn’t mentioned that you made them I would have thought they were real. I thought I was doing well just drilling out the ones that came with the kit.

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I have an M577 on the way, so I’ll just keep following this one… and use Gino’s work as a reference too.

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Looks great! I wasn’t a Mech guy, so can’t add anything to the 577 configuration, but I did have a very close relationship with Vietnamese dirt, and yours looks spot on. :slightly_smiling_face:
Also, the color you painted the track before weathering exactly matches the color in a photo I took of a new M113 belonging to the 2/22 Mech at Cu Chi in Spring of 1970. Nice work.

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I did a full interior on an 88!! :rofl:. Took me about two freaking years, and you can’t hardly see squat! Your model is looking great :+1:t3:

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It’s actually a mix. The cross bows are original plastic with a hole drilled vertically down the center. The ridge poles are plastic and are flattened on the ends (just squeezed with needle nose pliers) and small diameter rods glued in on two ends of one and one end on the other pole which has a hole drilled in for the pin.

The leg bottoms are the original kit pieces and the upper is an aluminum tube. I drilled out holes in the top and bottom of the lower piece and then glued a small piece of wire to a string for the pin which is glued to the upper. That has a hole so the pin either holds the rod in the extended or collapsed position.

The side poles were the most difficult, they’re all aluminum of different two different diameters so one can slide inside the other, and the angle pieces are cut to fit on the ends and accept either the cross bow pieces or the legs which conveniently are the same diameter.

And the connecting piece that mounts on the back of the track is a plastic rod which has been modified to have sort of a “yoke” (like on a drive shaft) that mounts over the bracket on the back of the track and has a hole and pin set up so it pivots.

The whole thing can be mounted on the brackets on the back of the track as individual pieces or removed and assembled just like the full scale vehicle.

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