T-34-85 Model 1944 Factory №174 RFM 5079

Vlad, could we see the T-34-85 vs a blue background if it isn’t too much hassle?

Visually I think the white background is trying to compete with the highlights.

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Beautiful job overall, darker staining in particular. It might be helpful to think of weathering in practical terms rather than in the abstract i.e. imagine what kind of terrain the tank might have recently been though. The white-ish residue looks fine if in a summer, dusty environment, and slightly darkening it also looks fine. Maybe the wheel recesses could do with some darker staining around the hubs & nuts, although I can see that might risk a dissonance between wheels & hull. It’s your baby!

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Wade! Unfortunately, I don’t have a blue background right now. There are only black and peach plastic backgrounds, which come with the softbox. But, I’ll try to look for something similar.

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Tim! I completely agree with you!
This is roughly how I try to approach my work - from a practical point of view. It’s just that it turned out that when I used a large number of different washes, pigments, and effects at different stages, I got something “own”. And this “own” was very different from each other. It turned out like this: the upper part of the hull and the turret with its own weathering color (“white”), the road wheels with its own (“light yellow”), the tracks with its own (“yellow-brown”), and the lower part of the hull — in addition to its color still in a completely different technique of execution. And all this caused a certain dissonance. And after a long period of downtime at work, I looked at the model and realized - NOT THAT! It is necessary to bring “everything to one denominator”. And now I’m trying to “even out” everything.
Regarding the road wheels, I also think that they need to be darkened further. I’ll try to apply another “thin” layer of MIG wash.

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Yes I guess there are two distinct types of weathering, (a) general wear and tear, rain, corrosion etc., and (b) specific weathering such as damage/scrapes and terrain mud. The (a) category should go on first, followed by (b). Which looks like what you’re doing!

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Greetings to all!
Worked with the road wheels!


I carefully analyzed the situation. And… I started to fix everything. :smile:
What was done?
First, I washed the joints between the rubber bandages and the road wheel disks with MIG productions Dark Wash. I didn’t like it. The brown shade wasn’t quite suitable for this. I repeated the procedure, but using Tamiya wash (Black). Got better. The wash visually “separated” the rubber from the disc. Before this, the road wheels looked somewhat unclear.
Then, using a very thin diluted Tamiya wash, I applied it in spots to the inner surfaces of the road wheels. And with a clean brush with pure white spirit, I shaded these dots. The result was not satisfying. I repeated the same procedure, but using A.MIG-1005 wash. Now the rollers somehow began to look more harmonious with the rest of the model.
For comparison:

I think I need to do the same thing again. Also, I think I need to make the front of the rubber bandages a little darker to bring out the “rubber” even more.

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Hi all!
I keep moving towards the finish line.
Another 16 hours of work!


What was done?
Once again I worked on the road wheels. I applied thinly diluted Tamiya Black twice to the inside of the rims and around the bolt heads, hubs, and hub caps. While I was doing all this, I got so carried away that I darkened the areas around the bolt heads on the right side too much. I had to correct it. First, I washed these areas with a very thinly diluted composition of A.MIG-1701, then with the same consistency liquid AK 080, and, after all this had dried, I again treated it with a thinly diluted black remover from Tamiya. I also used the same wash to darken the too-light and blurry outer sides of the rubber bandages. The bolt heads and hub caps were treated with a dry brush with Humbrol 150 paint.

Rubber bandages in places of contact with the tracks were wiped with Vallejo 73104 pigment.
Now, it seems to me, the road wheels have begun to look more harmonious.

I also installed the towing cable in its place, tying it with pieces of thin solder.
The next job was to use a pencil lead to process all the hinge joints and ridges of the tracks. First I painted them over with a pencil and then rubbed them with a silicone brush. This doesn’t look very good. I mean the shine of the metal. But, with a fully assembled chassis, I would hardly be able to do it better. In a good way, this should be done with paint and on un-glued caterpillar tape. But, I didn’t take any risks, so as not to spoil (paint over) the dirt on the tracks.


This time I used:

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Just… Amazing! I would have called it done long before now. I would have chocked the desk not being exactly to my liking up to fixing it on my next model, but you’ve completely altered it! :saluting_face:

When you’re finished altering the road wheels, you should post a before and after of them with the original dust and then your tweakings. That way we can fully see what you changed.

:grin:

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Vlad, your T-34-85 is exquisite!

Very inspiring :clap:, I very seldom see based pigment intenseive approaches to weathering I like and admire. You’re work is truly outstanding!

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Colin! Thank you so much!
I’ll try to somehow compose this epic into one or two photographs :joy: :rofl:

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Wade! Thank you so much! It makes a person feel very good when he knows that his work is valued and it benefits others.
And regarding weathering, chemistry, and everything else, I am planning a separate post. Your thoughts on this topic. But a little later.

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Friends!
Well, that’s all! This is the finish line! Almost… :rofl:
297 hours! The epic.

What was done in the next 4 hours of work?
I added some dust here and there. Namely - on the fuel tanks (they were too glossy), on the fan caps, on the gun barrel, on the front and rear fender liners, on the armor of the exhaust pipes, and in other various places.
Made traces of soot from the exhaust. Both pigment fixatives that I had were likely to become unusable, as they began to leave behind glossy streaks, so I simply rubbed the black pigment into such a state that it could not be erased with a brush.
Here and there I also added some transparent black wash from Tamiya. Here and there I added graphite powder (handrails, various protruding and sharp elements).

That’s all. Maybe I’ll try to make the hinged connections of the tracks more shiny. But, in general, the work is finished.


The next, difficult stage for me is preparation for the final photo shoot and, in fact, the photo shoot itself.
In the meantime, I’m experimenting with the camera, light, etc., I’ll write the promised review. This will not be so much a review as my impressions of the model.
And also, in a separate article, I want to share my thoughts about the whole work in general.

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Vlad, I’m looking forward to your thoughts on weathering and chemistry. A++

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Fantastic work. Has to be pretty much finished now, surely?

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Thank you! Yes, this is the finish line. Well, maybe I’ll try rubbing the hinges with graphite again. But not more.

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Your processes and critical thinking are an inspiration. I’ve been looking for ways to make the next big step up from being a decent intermediate modeller to being genuinely excellent and I’ve come to the conclusion that the difference lies in experience which will come, and in finishing, attention to detail, not finishing a model until it is finished etc, ie: “good enough” is no longer good enough.

Taking the time and effort you have on on this build on one of my models would be a major step forward for me. I aspire to be at your level one day. In the meantime thank you so much for sharing your build and what you have been doing to get it to this level. It is very informative and if I may say, thoroughly absorbing. Thank you!

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Thank you so much, Chris!
I tried to make this blog interesting and useful. Some things worked out, some didn’t. Either way, I think the time and effort was well spent. And it took a lot of time, as everyone could see. Assembly and weathering alone - 297 hours! :wink: And about the same amount of time, and maybe more, was spent taking photographs, writing comments, and blogging. :upside_down_face: It seems to me that during this time two or three more such models could have been built. :smile:
Absolutely right! You have clearly placed everything in its place. Critical thinking, attention to detail, the desire to complete the work, to do it exactly “as intended” and not “as it turns out.”These are the very components of complex work. It is clear that not everything and does not always work out well. But striving for this “well” allows you to achieve the desired results and accumulate the necessary experience.
I would also add to the list such things as perseverance and patience. And I needed a lot of them to bring the work to completion. But if a person loves modeling, then these things will come to him on their own over time. :blush:

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Wade! Today I had the opportunity to stop by an art store to pick out some colored paper for the background. There were a lot of blue shades there. Which one would you like to see as a background? Is there a name or an approximate picture so that I can get my bearings?

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Outstanding job Vlad. It came excellent. Nice subtle weathering.

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Richard, thank you!

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