35442 GERMAN 3T CARGO TRUCK 3,6-36S. PRITSCHE-NORMAL-TYPE. MILITARY SERVICE | Armorama™

BOX CONTAINS: MODEL OF TRUCK PE PARTS ARE INCLUDED 6 DECAL OPTIONS


This is partial text from the full article (usually with photos) at https://armorama.com/news/35442-german-3t-cargo-truck-3-6-36s--pritsche-normal-type--military-service
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So how very different - apart from the rear suspension - is
this from the Tamiya Blitz kit - and for how much more money ?!

Come on MiniArt give us the 4 wheel drive TROOP CARRIER VERSION - PLEASE !

Parts count and level of detailing?

Tamiya’s Blitz is nothing compared to Dragon’s version.
That is a great kit!
I hope that miniart will give us a 4x4.

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Guys, cmon, You should know Miniart by now. They will probably produce every possible version civy or military and milk this with decal variants for years.

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I certainly hope so :smiley:

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It also appears to say “Opel Blitz” on the radiator, as it should, whereas the Tamiya one doesn’t say anything to avoid copyright… There’s also the Italaeri Blitz, which does have this feature and despite it’s age does produce something that looks like an Opel Blitz and is much cheaper than any of them! The worst aspect of it is the tilt, but Tamiya evaded this by not providing one! Although there are much better kits available (hullo Dragon), I still have a bit of a soft spot for this relic, as Italaeri took a punt on a few German soft skins when the big boys didn’t bother.
The MiniArt kit shows six wheel nuts, like the Tamiya one, as opposed to the Italaeri’s original eight (which implied an impressed vehicle - the purpose built military ones had six). The box art makes no mention of Adam Opel though, the 3,6-36S was Opel’s model code but it was also made under licence by Mercedes amongst others.

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The Italeri kit is for sure outdated, but the general lines of the cab are still probably the best rendered to date. Somehow all the offerings from other brands suffer cab issues here or there.

The six and eight nuts wheels doesn’t have anything to do with civil or military production, these were just an evolution of the design. The earliest production Blitz had wheels with 6 nuts + 4 vent holes, these very soon evolved into the popular 6 nuts + 6 vent holes and thereafter into the final 8 nuts + 8 eight vent holes (around 1941, when the extra set of rear springs was introduced too). There were some subtle differences in wheel stamping along the production.

Curiously the Miniart boxart shows the cowl side vent flap (an early production feature) in front of the door, but that is absent in the Cads. Depending on how they arrange the parts, the base model could be squeezed to offerthe whole family, from earliest to final Opel Brandenburg production (changing hood, top and rear cab panels, rear axle, wheels, cargo body, headlights…), plus the license-built Mercedes L701 with its Einheitsfahrerhaus. I’d love a 4x4 variant (which could sell like candy), but it needs in fact much more work and new moulds than we might think, so looking at the sprues may tell what is coming and what not.

As an aside, it was planned to force Ford and Borgward to also produce the Blitz. Ford finally went around this promising to increase production of their own V3000, and Borgward was about to retool their factory when aerial bombing prevented this.

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I absolutely love the WH country sticked in the second camo. So that police abroad knows where you are from right ? It reminds me of a friendly discussion with a policeman on a reenactment event where we tried to explain to him that the WH license plate on our Kubel is original to that car and it wasnt oficialy revoked so it should be legal to drive right ?