Biplanes and Other Rigged Aircraft

They did an HP Heyford in 1/72. It builds into an impressive model.

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That rings a bell! I remember buying one years ago as the Heyford was such an unusual aircraft. Its well buried in the boxed up items still in storage after a long distance move some years ago.

Paul

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Matchbox did some really unique stuff. They also did the Supermarine Stranraer flying boat.

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Yes, that is the one I will be building.

In the past I build the straener. There I did the rigging before adding the top and bottom wing halves. Worked well, but painting was a hassle.

This time I want to try the technique of installing very small loops at all the rigging points before stringing out the lines. I might go crazy or it might look awesome - we will see :wink::smile::smile:

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Very good, I’m looking forward to seeing this one built and rigged. it certainly is an interesting aircraft. Did any of these survive?

Paul

We are getting pretty close to the start on this one and I’m looking forward to getting back to some modeling after an eight month break.

I want to do Hasegawa’s 50 year old Boeing F4B in 1/32 but still have not figured out how to rig it. This poop sheet is from the old WNW website:

That method looks like it might do well but leaves marrs on the bottom of the wing. Yes, touch up paint could be used but there has to be a better way?

Any other ideas?

Paul

I use stainless hard music wire - measure point to point with dividers - cut to length a hair long then trim as needed to fit .

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I use pretty much that method except I use fishing line, 4 or 7 lb depending on scale. Fishing line adds strength to builds that need it. My Roden BE2c wouldn’t hold together without it.
IMG_4786
The holes on the outside surfaces can be filled and often occur where the decals sit, in any case,I leave finishing those areas until after the wings are rigged.
The Matchbox Heyford is far from perfect but is an entertaining kit and a favourite of mine. Rigging is easy because the wings are split so top wing can be assembled with rigging fitted and I think I fitted the top face of the bottom wing, rigged the aircraft then fitted the bottom face
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Heyford (bottom) and Airfix HP O/400 together, a historical impossibility.
IMG_6600

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I would drill holes in the locations needed then attach the bottom of the top wing and the top of the bottom wing to the model. Then add kfishing keeping it tight or stretched sprue keeping it loose. Then assemble the wings. I don’t think you can tighten the fishing line later but with stretched sprue you can use a candle about 1’ above flame to slightly warm the sprue and it will tighten right up.

From one of our club meetings.

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As I understand it, this build is live now. I will shoot some before pictures of the F4B project before it gets rolling.

I look forward to seeing how the music wire rigging comes out.

Who else has a project to get started on?

Paul

I guess this is now on, as of today. :smirk:

I have a barely started P-26 to resume…

That’s all I’ve done on it up to now…

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I hope to get started later this week with an early wing warper.

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Well this one comes in under Other Rigged Aircraft and since this is a rigging campaign I have chosen the Wingnut Wings’ Jeannin Stahltaube (Steel Dove) which has plenty.

The blurb from the box:
The delicate bird-like Taube came to epitomize early German aircraft design. Wealthy Austrian industrialist Igo Etrich based his successful Taube design on the stable gliding characteristics of the Zanonia Macrocarpa seed as described by Professor Friedrich Ahlborn in his aeronautical research paper published in Germany in 1897. Igo began work in 1900, being joined by his engineer, Franz Wels, in 1903. Their remarkably stable and comparatively safe Etrich II Taube successfully took to the air in April 1910. Because of the previously published Ahlborn research paper the German patent office denied Etrich a patent for his design in September 1911. This led to a dizzying array of copycat Taube designs being churned out by dozens of German manufacturers. One of the most successful was the steel tube framed Jeannin Stahltaube 1914 Military Type (this model). It was powered by either 100hp Daimler-Mercedes D.1 or 120hp Argus As.II 6-cylinder engines and became one of the most widely operated Taubes in the German military. Aircraft such as the Taube were utilized for reconnaissance, but airman started carrying small bombs and personal firearms shortly after hostilities commenced. By the middle of 1915 any remaining Taubes in military service were relegated to training units.

The bird shaped wings

The last rigged plane I built was also a wing warper - WnW Fokker E.III - plenty of rigging on that as well

Looking forward to this campaign.
cheers
Michael

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I am going to try to build this one…

There is also a bit of resin, PE and some nice dacals in the kit…

First time I am going to try that rigging…

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The dry fit. Only 5 pieces here make the fuselage and wings of the Taube.

Cockpit assembly underway which is not much more than a steering wheel and a couple of seats, oh, and a lot of bracing wires and control cables.

cheers
Michael

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@bwilt Interesting choice of kit. I just recently bought the same - mostly due to the Danish decals :wink:
I will follow your build with interest. Please share any findings about the kit and any areas to look out for.

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Thanks and I will show some progress here, but to warn you, I also came across this…
you tube video about this kit… “probably the worst kit I ever built”…

The cockpit of my steel dove is completed.
Began with the bracing for the steel frame.

That was pretty straightforward. It got a little more complex with the control cables in the cockpit itself. The pilot would certainly have to be careful with his boots when climbing in.

The whole picture

and the instrument panel

Finished now with seats and wheel in place.

The engine bearers are awaiting the 100hp Daimler-Merc which is up next.

cheers
Michael

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Very nice work Michael . It seems you enjoy a variety of modeling subjects just like me !
I am currently working on WnW Albatros. Wonderful kit but the lozenge decals are terrible.
If I had it to do over I wouldn’t most certainly use the set from Aviattic. Will definitely get them for the WnW D VII in the stash .

Thanks Richard. In a fit of patriotic duty I bought a few of these WnW kits when they came out. I do like the two seaters especially and the rigging doesn’t really bother me.
I used to build ships before I started building cars as Joel’s enthusiasm lured me on to the Automodeler site but I always like building planes, I just didn’t use to post them.
Looking forward to seeing the Albatros kit finished and note that I will need some aftermarket lozenge if I ever get around to building it.

cheers
Michael