Chippin’

Fellow modelers: let me ask you, how long do you usually wait before you let paint dry over chipping medium? Some guys hardly wait at all, others go back the next day. I don’t care if it’s acrylic or lacquer. I’m not finding my wait time very productive. I usually wait about ten minutes for acrylic, or even use a mild hair dryer. Just not quite happy with what’s left to play with.

1 Like

Wait time from airbrushed to chipped?

I cleaned my air brush, visited the restroom & drank another cup of coffee then got after it.

First model chipped.

3 Likes

The directions I’ve read from Ammo Mig state that you should wait 15 to 20 minutes after you apply the paint to start chipping. Also depends on what kind of paint you’re using, i.e if you’re using Vallejo paints, as well as paints from, say, Ammo Mig, they won’t chip as well. I’ve not had good results with Vallejo colors with chipping, not really tried any other brands yet besides Ammo. Waiting too long to chip your model can result in you not being able to chip your model, i.e. I’ve waited several hours before and barely been able to chip. Also, keep in mind that you should be painting fin coats of paint over chipping fluid rather than one big thick one, the thicker the coat, the harder it is to chip. That’s just my two cents, so please take it with a grain of salt. I’ve not used chipping fluid for much other than whitewash.

4 Likes

perfect! i’m assuming acrylic? i have chipped lacquer using fiberglass tipped brushes

2 Likes

brilliant! i don’t use Vallejo much. mostly Tamiya and AK acrylic. i have chipped Tamiya lacquer and Model Master. thin coats; that’s the rub

1 Like

I used Tamiya White XF-2 thinned with Tamiya X20A thinner. Used water & old paint brush to chip plus backside of #11 blade for longer thin scratches. In some areas the midel got one coat, others two coats a few three coats of white…all thin coats of course. It’s easier to build base modulation with thin coats.

FWIW - The paint underneath the chipping fluid is enamel Floquil Railroad Road Weathered Black & enamel Floquil Military Color Dark British Green both thinned with the secret sauce (xylol & lighter fluid). Hard core lacquer & enamel fan. I dislike acrylic paints in general unless they can be thinned with Mr Color Leveling Thinner…basically making them acrylic-lacquers.

Being my first experience with chipping I wanted a base coat & color coat that would resist softening if exposed to Tamiya paint thinned with X20A.

2 Likes

Thanks for the suggestions im going to attempt to chip my 1/16 Tiger probably gonna have to work fast,plan to do the hull and turret separately,but the suggestionabout the thin coats should be helpful.
How about the hairspray coat,how thin or thick?

3 Likes

Not sure what others do.

I shot a basic cross-hatch pattern. I sprayed one thin coat of chipping fluid rotated the model 90 degrees and did a thin second coat.

2 Likes

I use various sizes and density of sponges and foam to chip with.

2 Likes

i try to do foam and chemical chipping

I’ve been practicing some weathering on small sheet plastic, as I’m new to armor and not a great airbrush-er. I tried the hair spray - first test, worked great, but I used too much and had large chips. Second test, not enough, I guess, I couldn’t get chipping! I only waited about 15 mins both times.

I love the “wear” of chipping, and am experimenting with a lighter coat of the base to show fade/sun damage/wear, but I will try the hairspray again. It does work, I just need more experience!

3 Likes

Dear Rokket

I think chipping is probably one of the more overdone techniques and probably using some degree of chemical vs foam technique is advisable, but nothing is more important than having the chipping make sense. For instance, why would there be an excess of chipping on the side of a turret unless there’s some obvious reason for ingress/egress to the tank. I see some models with crazy chipping, but it’s their model, not mine. I personally try to do it where it’s more likely to be worn by friction, or even chemical spills. Plus, foam chipping temds to be more conservative in application than hairspray or chipping medium. Using huge chipping brush strokes doesn’t make too much sense either. I think having a purpose for where and how much there is and deciding what kind to use is the challenge. VMS has a new chipping paint that can be reduced on the model unlike most paints. It goes on with foam or brush, but you can use their weathering carrier I think to erase excess chipping paint.

1 Like

For me, it’s useful to know what sort of paint the 1:1 vehicle carried. Like, IJN aircraft seem to have been painted in watercolors that fell apart the moment tge prop started turning. Mid 90’s automobiles after paint reformulation are the same. On the other hand, modern American CARC is super tough. It gathers dirt like a Hoover but it takes a lot to actually chip the stuff.

1 Like

I agree. I’ve seen some great chipping and rust, but waaay overdone. That’s why I like slight wear/fade more. I understand Shermans had tough OD paint, so I don’t expect chipping, but I would like to see a little wear (and to have experience doing chipping for other projects).

I will check out VMS. Some homemade solutions are good I think, like chalk dust instead of spending US $50 for a tiny bottle of Special Stuff, but sometimes you just need the right stuff.

Light seems to make a big difference. I just finished the robot from Metropolis (“Futura” in the book apparently), and sources say the suit was silver with a mix of bronze powder, a “warm silver.” I mixed copper with gunmetal. It look good out in the sun, but maybe a tad too coppery. Inside, even under cool white LED, it looks about right, and in regular room light it looks silver. It’s hard to pick “good/perfect” because conditions matter. Some things have to be exaggerated, others downplayed.

But thanks for the info, and about VMS,

1 Like

Very good point. Knowing the Real Thing is key. Paint was different in the 1940s. The Germans and USN both had weather problems with submarine paint. 3 months of sun and salt and black was gray. I just read that some US WWII aircraft were painted in gloss, so that determines if you do a flat or satin overcoat.

2 Likes

Wink,
I have never used hairspray for chipping. Too radical and uncontrolled. When I first started chipping, I used paint, sponges, foam, and brushes. Got great results. But now, I get even better, more controlled results - I use Prismacolor artist’s pencils for chipping. I can do very specific, tiny chips, and draw them on, in any color I choose. The results are the best I’ve ever done. You can buy the pencils individually for $1 a piece in the colors you need at any art store or big box stores like Hobby Lobby and Michaels. Cool Grey 90% perfectly replicates darkened steel; get two of those. Burnt Umber is good too, but you’ll find uses for all the colors and have range and control over your chipping without creating a big mess.
P.S. - Don’t buy the AK Interactive weathering pencils, they don’t work.

3 Likes

Thanks for that, Matthew. It’s a great idea. I like the drawing in, and theoretically, a pencil will last a long time.

I do like the sponge technique, and I’m not (too) afraid of brushing in chips. For this next project, I mainly want to show slight wear and fade. I guess slight overcoats for highlights is something I will practice, as well as the pencils. I know a regular pencil works well on tracks.

2 Likes

For paint brush application of chipping, I like one of those cheap terrible Testor’s nylon brushes like this one with just a faint trace of paint on the tips of the bristles.

Applied by stabbing like a pin pointed sponge.

3 Likes

Bed for Miniart British lorry .
This was done with the hairspray method.
Primed with Tamiya rattle can fine grey primer.
Underpainted with mix of Tamiya’s IJN grey/ red brown. Two coats Testor’s Dullcoat lacquer.
Two coats Tres Seme hairspray. Base color Tamiya flat yellow. Highlighted with Tamiya flat yellow lightened with flat white . All colors acrylic thinned 50/50 with Tamiya yellow cap lacquer thinner.
Chipping begun with interior bed floor by flooding with water soon after painting and stroking with soft flat brush - this lifted large
chips . The rest done over two days with less water and smaller brush .

4 Likes

That looks great!

2 Likes