Homemaid paint booth?

Hello everyone!
Would anybody have any ideas on making an spraybooth?
Also would it be possible to make one that doesn’t vent to the outside?
I’m in the basement and don’t have access to a outside exhaust vent.

Are you planning on spraying any paints with a toxic thinner/base? If not the booth only needs to filter out the pigments from the spray. In that scenario you do not need to vent outside.
Otherwise you should re-examine your venting options. One might be using an existing dryer vent. In that case I would set up a gate in each feed. One for the dryer and one for the spray booth. Shut the one not in use. Only use one at a time.
The shorter the run of tubing to the vent the better.

The booth itself is easy. It’s a box with one side open. Cut a hole in the back or top for the fan.
I used particle board.

I wanted to paint mostly acrylics, Tamiya Vallejo.
I’ve seen somewhere a person used a box with filter in it attached by tubing to the spray booth to filter the air.
I don’t have access to a vent.
Why I’m asking is that when I want to prime the model, the stink is pretty bad.

My gut feeling is that stink is gonna stay in the basement unless you’ve got some pretty sophisticated filter. They exist hence the respirators with organic solvents cartridges.
Here’s a couple of links. Expensive! and I don’t know how long before it needs to be replaced.
Maybe a pre-filter that takes out the paint particles will help it last longer?

You’ll also need to make sure your fan is up to the job of pulling air through that filter.

https://www.labconco.com/product/organic-vapor-carbon-filter/2311
https://www.2spi.com/category/ductless-fume-hoods-filters/

It’s more about the solvent that you use than the paint. For example, if you thin your Tamiya with lacquer thinners like Gunze, I’d recommend venting the fumes outside somewhere and wearing a vapour mask. Otherwise your options are greater.

I did consider building one but the challenges of getting hold of a suitable explosion-proof motor led me to buy a booth. Cost me under £100 and works fine.

I think I’ve seen a setup where the exhaust was sucked through to a bucket of water, trapping the smell in there. Don’t know the specifics and forget where I saw it, but with some googling you might find it.

I also do almost entirely Vallejo, my ‘booth’ is just an open topped & faced cardboard box that’s sole purpose is to prevent overspray getting all over my work area.

I built mine out of corrugated plastic yard signs, I based the rear of it off a 20x24 filter and sloped it up using the old eyeball “yup that looks good method”. In the back behind the filter I installed a 4’ dryer vent and popped out the louvers so its a straight shot. The fan I’m using to draw through there in an old computer rack cooling fan that pulls through well enough (cost $0.00) that i rigged up with the other end of the dryer vent centered over the cooling fan. My friend gave me a flexible strip of LED’s so I ran those around the opening for additional soft lighting. Mines pretty big, maybe got a little slap happy with the size but for the less than $30.00 for filters and the dryer vent its cheap enough to redo. Not the sturdiest as its a duct tape assembly but I rarely move it. Even without venting I still aim the airbrush at the filter and the set up does a good job keeping vapors contained and the volume is large enough to work on even a 48th scale bomber. Scrounge up the plastic off of old election signs, they use the same stuff. Cheap and free always sounds good to me.

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