MFH's Ducati 750 Super Sport 1974

Thanks Damian!
On the group build that’s good to see. I may change tack depending on how long the bike takes.

cheers
Michael

Great to have you along Richard.
One day I will have to find out why wire wheels went out of fashion for bikes, though now coming back for some new bikes. I know they use to be hell to clean, maybe it was just a weight issue. Anyway it was an interesting challenge.

cheers
Michael

Hi Joel,
Thanks for the support. I am not an expert on wire wheels but what MFH provided was a centring jig for the hub and rim. In their usual fashion, they provided dimples for where the holes are meant to be and invite you to drill them out. In this build the spokes are meant to enter the hub on an angle and I drilled the holes that way, only about 1mm, as you just need the tip to sit there with a touch of CA. What it was on the actual bike I don’t know. I haven’t seen a picture for this bike I think they may originally entered the hub perpendicularly and the spoke bent on an angle back towards its point on the rim.

cheers
Michael
Hope that helps

As with all classics, cars or bikes, original parts are an issue. No less with the Ducati 750SS. I have seen them for sale where there disparaging comments about how original they are etc, especially since that is where all the value is.
I watched a great video of a guy in California who bought his new in 1974 and finally decided to sell it last year. It’s a discussion mainly about the attractions of the bike etc but he did his own maintenance and even 45 years later it looked pretty good. It made me buy the kit since I will never be able to buy the real thing.
Here’s the link if you’re interested Earned: The Story of Keith Hale’s Ducati 750ss on Vimeo

Michael,
Thanks for the info as it certainly does help.

joel

Well for a change from lacing spoke wheels I have been building the chain over the last couple of days.
Components are a sheet of photo etch clips. The beauty of these, and the sheer relief, that they don’t need to be cut from the gate.

I don’t have a technical name for the other part of the links, but they’re in white metal and needed a quick clean up with a sharp blade. The metal flash flicks off with a knife.


and of a course a jig to keep them in place.

One side with its overlapping clips


both sides complete

I needed to do four in all, as the chain is 112 links.
You will have noticed at this stage the links are still attached to their “sprue”. This was the slowest part of the chain build, cleaning up the pieces. A sharp knife will remove the excess and round off the piece. (When building with white metal it is easy to cut with a #11 blade but you do go through a few of them)

And a section of chain completed

And completed. It is too long at present but when it comes time to fit I have some leeway for adjustments.

And back to the rear wheel for the weekend.

cheers
Michael

3 Likes

And armor guys think link and link track it bad….MFH said hold my beer. I will say the floating PE bits is a great idea.

Great job so far. :+1:

Great job Michael ! I’m just about to start on the Tamiya PE chain for the RC 166 . Their approach is a little different . Is your Duc 1/9 scale ?
Cheers -Richard

Michael,
OMG!!! That chain looks amazing. Of course the amount of work to produce it is just as amazing.

the trend to use sticky tape to hold the individual pcs of a fret in place is certainly a God send for sure. Removing them was hard enough for me as I often damaged some pcs, but then trying to file off the remaining nubs was usually a disaster.

joel

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Thanks Ryan. I haven’t built a tank since I was a kid but I do follow the builds on Armorama. The metal tracks look interesting and a bit like this chain, I guess a matter of repetition and getting into the rhythm.

cheers Michael

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First off, great build! And I though lacing new aluminum Sun rims was hard…
Love anything motorcycle related. That chain is off the hook.

As for the PE, the idea of not having it attached to anything goes back to at least 1989. I had a caboose detail set in HO scale the was like that. I was to laugh when MiG tried to claim it as his idea years later.

Hi Richard, 1/9 scale. I guess there is a whole history on why manufacturers chose 1/19 scale for large scale bikes. I will be interested to see how Tamiya handled the chain and the wheels.

cheers
Michael

Cheers Joel. The “floating” PE must be a more complex thing to achieve since they don’t do with the other etch in the kit. As you, say it would have been a nightmare to clean up each link, especially since I used 240 of them.

cheers
Michael

Thank you! I didn’t know that about the etch, I thought it was a recent very recent development since you don’t see it often. I didn’t know Mig (of AMMO fame?) had claimed it. I didn’t think they even sold PE.

cheers
Michael

Turning attention to the engine now. I have decided not to paint but try for a cast metal effect for the main block and polished elements where required. It’s a work in progress at the moment but here’s we are at the moment


and then a dry run of building out the cylinder fins, which starts with a pile of fins


fortunately they’re numbered so you know the order they go in
Starts at the top plate with four bolts

and then add layers


and more

and you get a cylinder block that doesn’t quite fit yet

Still a fair bit to do here but I have a rough idea now of how this works and what needs to be sorted.

cheers
Michael

3 Likes

That looks sooooo good Michael, lovely work!

Cheers, D

Michael,
Your decision to not paint but rub out and polish the engine casting I guess using steel wool really paid off is Spades. No way could I tell the difference between a full size block and the kit block as yours looks about as real as one could ever get a kit one to look.

As for that cylinder head. Damn, does that look good once built up. This is turning into another one of your epic builds for sure.

joel

Continuing to work on engine though I have lost the use of my favourite tool for the moment - a fibreglass brush. It is essential for cleaning the white metal and is invaluable for getting into the nooks and crannies. Unfortunately the metal is pretty tough on the fibreglass and I have worn the brush away. We are in lockdown at the moment so I have ordered some replacements. Hopefully here soon. But continuing to polish away, an example here are the exhaust header pipes - one partially done, the other untouched


You can see the unpolished one with its mold seams. They require removal with a sharp knife first before the sanding. It’s quite nice to listen to some music and polish the various bits. they do look better than painting them chrome but they’re not flawless due the white metal but I guess it can be viewed as its own form of weathering.
I am also at a bit of impasse for the colour. The 750SS had a one off colour scheme - metallic sea green frame and silver body. I have asked Gravity if they’ll mix a couple of brews up for me so fingers crossed.

cheers
Michael

3 Likes

Looking very nice Michael. Great tip on the fiberglass brush . I’ll have to order a few for my upcoming build.
Cheers - Richard

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Michael,
What a huge difference in the two exhaust pipes: Before and After. Not sure if anyone could get that finish with Metallizers, but for sure I can’t. Not even coming close.

I’m also very interested in those fiberglass brushes as i have a very poor record of cleaning out recessed panel lines after sanding. Can you post a few pictures of what they look like, so I have a better idea of where to look to order a few of them.

joel