Recommendations for Sherman Firefly kit

Hey folks,
I am looking for recommendations for a Sherman Firefly 1/35 scale kit. I know there are a few out there, and some seem hard to find, but aside from cost, which do you think is the best overall?
Many thanks, Clint

Good night. In my opinion any of the Tasca/Asuka kits are worth it and although I don’t know it directly the RFM kit seems to be quite good if not on par with the previous ones.
Tasca/Asuka:
https://www.perthmilitarymodelling.com/reviews/vehicles/tasca/tasca35009.htm
https://archive.armorama.com/review/8255/
http://www.missing-lynx.com/reviews/britain/tasca35027reviewab_1.html

RFM:
http://www.missing-lynx.com/reviews/britain/rfm5038reviewab_1.html
Greetings :wink:.

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i second the Ryefield. Have one in the stash.

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I would also add the Asuka Firefly; Asuka/Tasca usually has some very nice Shermans, and i can imagine their Firefly VC is no exception.

Well I’ve been thru a few here and there, and yet have never bought the RFM (yes I’m a RFM fan boy). The Asuka kits are the top of the line for me, and if you happen upon a Tamiya 5c Firefly; it’s a fine kit. Goes together like a reboxed Asuka Firefly. Asuka does the Firefly MK. Vc as well as the Firefly Ic composite hulled Firefly. Study the tank your after because Asuka covers about every version or field mod out there. I will own the RFM kit about as soon as my checking account arises back from the ashes.
gary

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Every review I have seen praises the RFM VC kit above even the Tasca/Asuka one, which is no mean feat - Tasca’s two are fantastic kits (they do a VC and a IC composite version). I have two Shermanaholics in my club and they both said the RFM is the Firefly to buy. I do believe that the RFM kit only makes an early version though, where Asuka offers options - but I may be wrong.

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The IC Firefly is also a very nice choice.

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Thank you all! Sounds like the RFM is the way to go, and it is more easily available. I appreciate your advice!
Clint

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I have built the Tasca Vc. Great kit! I have the RFM VC in the stash. It has everything the tasca has but improves in some areas with super crips modeling. You won’t go wrong with either

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The one thing i like about Asuka/Tasca is that they have a large offering of Sherman variants, including recovery vehicles, which you don’t see often in full kit form. I have the Asuka M32B1 ARV on my wish list.

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Not to mention that their store offers extra parts, so if you find a one-off variant that you’ve never seen before, chances are, you will be able to craft it using Asuka components.

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Tamiya kit IS the Asuka/Tasca kit. Get the Tasca and save yourself a couple hundred dollars. (Last Tamiya one I saw was going for $350! As Marti Luther King once said … I have a DREAM …

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Tasca/ Asuka all the way. Hobbylink 1999 has them… Ic Hybrid and Vc …for about $40.

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Thanks everyone, the Asuka kit looks intriguing, but difficult to find here in Canada…I will probably go with the RFM. Really looking forward to this build!

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We look forward to your build as well. :+1:

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I enjoyed the Tamiya/Tasca kit myself.

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I managed to get hold of the Asuka Firefly second hand for about €30,-. Cheap by itself, but also found out that there is a aluminum barrel included! I did buy Friul tracks, however as I despise the rubber band tracks included…

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Hi golikell, it is interesting you mention tracks…I am new back to the hobby after a 35 year (!!) absence, and I am amazed at all the “after market” accessories, like cannon barrels that are available now. I just finished Tamiya’s 1/35 scale Churchill, and after all the paint, weathering and mud, I think the tracks look amazing. So I would be interested in your opinion (and others!) about what differences you find with the after market tracks…? Thank you! Clint

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Clint, you know how to open the can of worms don’t you.

What it will all boil down to is personal preference. For me that means look at what is in the kit and decide what I am happy with, or not.

What is the detail like, are there irreparable defects, are they the right type for what I am building. The ‘rubber band’ type can be problems if they have knock marks, flash, etc, that is very difficult to correct. Older kits, especially early Tamiya kits, often have no detail on the inside so I will replace them. They are one continuous flat piece - no representation of link separation, etc. For example, their SdKfz 250 Tracks:

Other times the band type tracks have been twisted in the box and nothing makes them sit right - again I replace them.

If the kit comes in link and length sections, I look to see if the joined lengths look realistic. If no I replace them. If they look good, I will use them.

If it is a Dragon kit with their DS tracks I replace them, no matter how good they look in the box. These are little time bombs that can ruin a kit, or a shelf, when they begin to ooze oil, dry and crack.

I so not use Fruil or other metal tracks on vehicles with live suspension (such as the Sherman) as they sag unless you glue them or they are very tight. I use Bronco ones, but many guys hate those because of the number of parts.

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Peter sums it up pretty much… One thing he didn’t mention is the way rubber tracks sit on an uneven base.
They are always tout.

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Thanks a lot for the opinions, yes, I can see I have a lot of catching up to do and a lot to learn…which is great!

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For the live suspension tracks, I prefer the one piece tracks,my favorite are metal tracks,but they can be pricey.

I have found these 3-D tracks go be a good option and reasonably priced

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