What’s with the Wittmann Hagiography?

Great point. Modern history in some ways is a reflection in the mirror of past history.

thanks for the linguistic and syntactical salve. i blame autocorrect

We all do.
I do too, even if I have it turned off :grin: :rofl: :rofl:

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What happens when autocorrect becomes self-aware like Skynet? Will their bots roam the Earf’ ‘ trying to cull the human race?

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Maybe you get a pop-up message saying:
“Hey man, this text is total BS. Revise it now!”

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Smart choice :+1: :smiley:

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When a Single Tank Saved Israel is the story of Zvika Greengold’s actions during the 1973 Yom Kippur War. He felt that the Israeli army had reached the end of the road, and that he was alone with just one tank to stop an enemy brigade.

Sounds sort of familiar :thinking:

Ghost w/Leo 2 sounds like a fun wargame scenario!

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My mother was born a few months after the Titanic sank (I don’t think the two were connected) and she could remember her Grandmother’s distress when one of her sons (Mum’s uncles) was reported missing in Mesopotamia during WW1 (he actually survived, unlike so many others: I believe he was taken prisoner by the Turks). Mum worked in a ROF explosives factory in WW2, her brother served in the RAF in West Africa. She didn’t meet my Dad until after the war, he’d made a couple of visits to Europe, once with the BEF and then went back via Normandy.
He spent some time before demob in Germany after their surrender and formed a favourable opinion of the Germans in general: “They’d always hide you when you were being chased by the Military Police”… About a decade after hostilities ended we (Mum, Dad, and a very young me) were allocated a council house on a new estate and our neighbours across the way were a German family, the husband having been recruited to service imported machinery at a new factory. There were never any problems (despite there being other veterans on our road) and over the years my mother became close friends with the wife. Another chap I became acquainted with somewhat later had a German mother his father had met while he was there at the same time as my Dad; a couple of her kid brothers had been moved from the Hitler Youth to the Waffen-SS towards the end of the conflict but survived. There were several individuals at my schools with Italian surnames, their fathers having been in a local PoW camp. One thing I only became fairly recently was that on the other side of the Solway, in Galloway, was a substantial community of Ukrainians who had thrown their lot in with the Nazis, been taken prisoner at the end of hostilities (in Italy?) and as they couldn’t go home ended up as internees in southern Scotland because no-one knew what to do with them; eventually they just assimilated into the local community…

Regards,

M

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I wonder if “Eisenbach” is a fictionalised Fulda. I can remember, many years ago,
a bit of a kerfuffle when the dignitaries of the said town discovered there was a game of a WW3 conflict featuring their burg: the problem being whatever scenario was played one side or the other ended up nuking the place, no exceptions…

Cheers,

M

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Well said.

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