British military radio antennas

Knowing very little about communications systems, I am wondering why certain military vehicles would be fitted with two antennas. I am currently working on a model of the Humber Pig (circa 1970, Northern Ireland). On the rear of the vehicle, there are mounts for two antennas … would this be standard for such vehicles?

Thanks,

Paul

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Depends how many radios/nets you are running. If you are only running one radio and one net (frequency) you would only need to use one mount (ABA) and one antenna. If you are running 2 radios /2 nets you would need 2 mounts (ABAs) and 2 antennas.
Usually you would have 2 mounts and 2 antennas fitted. one would be for the Sqn/Coy radio/net and the other would be for Regimental radio/net use. That would be say on a normal gun tank in a Sqn. The Sqn Leaders tank would have 3 mounts (ABAs) fitted with 3 antennas, 1x Sqn net or or the Infantry Bn net you are working alongside , 1x Regimental net and the 3rd mount will be for Brigade main or higher formation net etc.
For NI, pigs may well have had 2 mounts (ABAs) fitted but may only use one if they are only operating a Coy/Sqn net and nothing else.
There are a few other configurations for set ups, but those above are pretty general layouts.

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As a Sapper in an Armd Engr Troop, on a CET, we had to do all that with one Clansman!

Well, Troop Net, Unit you were supporting Net and BG Net.

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Johhnych01 & Khouli,

Thanks for your informative responses.
The model of the Humber Pig I am working on is a 3D printed item (1/76 scale) from Badger 3D.
With the exception of few minor improvements, this is an excellent piece, and highly recommended.
As with their other releases, it is available in various scales.

Paul

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Would be nice to see a few shots of it Paul before paint to see what the naked detail is like ? Some of their stuff looks very interesting

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