Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore

The best tread match for the snake proof high top boots proved to be Live Resin (LRE 35296) LOWA Zephyr GTX Boots with low trouser-leg position in 1/35 scale. Good to protect the feet.

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Painting Mossy Oak BREAK-UP COUNTRY pattern required detailed branch and leaf spots.

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Took the figure head from a Russian 'polite green man" for the rendering of the cloth face covering. Heavily modified the top of the head into a Remington baseball cap.

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Added a scratch made rolled up shooting mat for a back rest. The mat pad was made from Milliput & paper straps.

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When the figure was placed up in the stand, the butt gap off the stand platform was apparent.

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Putty was added.

Does this putty make my butt look fat?

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More to follow soon.

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Great work.

Have you thought about posting that figure in the figure campaign?

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Thank you for looking and the kind comments. I can definitely share this figure at the other location if appropriate. I may have another photo or two to add as well! I appreciate what you’ve done to share and promote the hobby. All the best- SG

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The campaign allows for posting many places. As the moderator for the campaign, I think it would a welcoming addition.

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Thank you! Will start adding to the campaign as well

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BUCKY 1/35 scale whitetail deer figures in reasonable poses were rare. A 3D printed figure from Shapeways made by PRINTLE SHOP “Printle Thing Deer - 1/35” looked useful.

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The 3D deer figure was sectioned (dismembered) to create individual molded parts for modification.

Silicon molds and resin were used to make individual legs that were heated and shaped.

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With some practice, putty, and patience, the body was configured to the desired pose.

The resin head was modified with heat and putty and used to create new molds.

There were a number of rejected mold attempts at a proper head. There were more rejected attempts at a usable head.

Finally created a mold to form a believable white tail deer head.

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What County in Kentucky? Just wondering as I live in Lexington.

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Hi Michael! Yes Jefferson County as I am in Louisville. Most of the better hunting I suggest, however is farther west in KY

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Yep, grew up in downtown Louisville (Shelby & Oak Streets)
My Great Uncle had a farm WAY out Dixie Highway and I have spent more than a little bit of time volunteering at the Patton Museum, Ft. Knox.

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Yes! I miss the Patton Museum. Even the Knob Creek yearly shoot is paused since the pandemic. We still go that direction for Mike Linnig’s fish dinners by the river.
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BUCKY Modeling the rack of antlers was an interesting challenge. Molding and resin casting a wire form was not giving a satisfying result for such small-scale antlers. Using .015 inch diameter piano wire for just the port and starboard main beams allowed shaping and subtle changes on the head.

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Next 0.008 to .010 inch stretched plastic sprue was glued with CA glue on the main beam, so placed to form the rest of the rack.

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The resulting plastic branched points were bent to shape and trimmed. Finally liquid surfacer smoothed and tapered the joined branches of the antlers.

Small details like the “acorn” (created by a deer antler broken in velvet and later healing to leave a bulge or knot) were added with the liquid surfacer.

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Painting of Bucky included a Tamiya primer base followed with brush applied Vallejo neutral gray, flat earth, black, and white acrylics. This was followed by an airbrushed layer of clear Future. Next were applied layers of blending colors using Grumbacher oil based paints in between more airbrushed coats of Future.

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The final layer was a rattle can spray of Testor’s Dull Coat. Bucky’s tongue was painted glossy grayish pink with blue high lights.

More to follow soon.

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