Practice weathering

I’ve finally broken lurker cover to say you’ve done some very nice work indeed here. As you’ve no doubt discovered it’s a fine line between not enough & too much. Although maybe there’s more leeway than we think, given that in any line of rolling stock we’d see quite a wide spectrum of weathering, so it would be more unrealistic if they were all weathered the same.

I’m a broken record singing the praises of the other handy weathering medium – pastel chalks. Scrape a fine powder off sticks of various light brown shades & use a soft brush to dab it on to taste. :tumbler_glass:

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Hi Dioramartin…
Thanks…how durable are chalks? I haven’t used them before…

I’ve used loose pigments on armour and unless they are sealed or fixed they tend to come off with handling…or the inevitable dusting when you don’t have a display case

I think freight cars can be really weathered to the max if one likes that look as there are a lot of extreme weathered cars out there. Unless you are tied to specific prototype modelling there is a lot of room to just experiment. To me, dirty cars look better than clean ones rolling along the track…how dirty is the rub.

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Nice roof shot.

Multiple projects on the go last couple of days…
Took a newer Athearn GWS gondola and a very thinned white Tamiya white fade coat…
Then I tried 2 layers of W+N oils with blue white grey and then browns umbers and black …
Then Tamiya grime coat…
Sealed at different times during the process with Krylon flat and Tamiya XF-86

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Dave pastel dust’s surprisingly tenacious even on semi-glossy surfaces, and almost impossible to remove accidentally if the surface has been very, very, very lightly sanded first (800 or 1000 grade). A light flat/matt lacquer spray on top should remove any fear of fingerprints although I’ve never found it necessary because, typically, the dust goes into/onto places fingers don’t usually go. On the other hand it’s easy to intentionally reduce with a stiff brush/toothbrush or remove altogether with a wet one.

Apart from looking realistic I like it because it’s a dry process and you’ve got to try incredibly hard to screw it up, and even then it’s easily reversible. My experience with weathering media is that the degree of difficulty rises sharply with the amount of fluid involved :tumbler_glass:

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yes, lots of scrap tank parts in those gondola

Yup…Lots of tank parts…

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Finished weathering another car today…this time another old Athearn kit…

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Dave, your technique and effects are excellent. Some of your model weathering, like the Santa Fe and IC, is restrained, I dare say.

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Thanks…
I am just trying out different stuff for me…

You are doing awesome work. I wish my weathering looked this good. I’ll have to try oils again.

A tale of two box cars… these started out the same shade of blue…
The Great Northern got a heavy coat of X-20A with a couple drops of Tamiya White as a base coat

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Finally got some time to weather some more gondolas…

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I like looking through all that scrap and identifying parts that I recognize.

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That’s half the fun of making the loads… :grinning:

Every modeler can take a cue from this.

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I’ve been spending modelling time on multiple projects…which means nothing ever gets finished, but Sunday night I pulled another gondola out and started weathering it…

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Kirk,

Enjoying your work. Any updates pending?

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This weekend’s work…

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Kirk,

Would you be interested in posting a how-to, say 4-6 pix from the prepped unweathered model, through your mixing/adding/finishing a model with your oils? I suspect it would be very welcomed by many of us.