T-34-85 Model 1944 Factory №174 RFM 5079

Two serious comments.

  1. Vlad, my highest praise for your work and diligence, A+++

Outstanding thread with a fantastic T-34-85 build and much interesting commentary. Covering the process & thinking aspect of model building and visualization is something rare and well worthwhile.

  1. Thank you for the inspiration, Vlad!

My take away, I want to learn to apply pigments similar to “Vlad’s style”. These older bargain priced Tamiya kits from a show last month, will provide test projects without taking too much build time in the near future. I just have to finish a few more of my WW2 jerry shelf queens before starting a new project.

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I restored an older car years ago. I was working for a carpet cleaning company and some of the commercial jobs took days of just moving the cleaning wand back and forth. It was those times where I would mentally disassemble and reassemble parts of the car. I would think about what could be reused and what would be needed to be replaced or repaired. I thought of what order I needed to do the work and when to acquire the parts. Hours and hours of mental planning were done. When the work on the car began, I knew what I needed to do and when I needed to do it. The plan had already been made and I was just following it.

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I built the last one on your stash at around the same time as Vlad built his.

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Mine was a quick build. Nothing at the level of Vlad’s work.

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Tim! Thank you so much!

100%!
And I’ll add on my own behalf: searching for and implementing alternative solutions = invaluable life experience.

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Wade! Thank you for your highest appreciation of my work!
I now fully realized that all these sleepless nights, countless photographs and comments, and an insane amount of time wasted were not in vain.
Wade! It sounds cool, of course, but there is no “Vlad’s style” here :blush: I’m just trying to do it diligently, with soul. I’m ready to spend as much time on this as necessary. And I’m ready for the fact that something may have to be redone. And, as always, with skepticism about my work, I will add that there are no super-outstanding results in it.
Wow! The field for activity is very wide!
And I’m just about to complete my T-34-76 with a stamped turret! So we can do it together!

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And I’ll add that it’s just cool to assemble, paint, and put on a shelf! Without any hassles with weathering and other things!

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And everything went like clockwork :blush: A familiar feeling to me!

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Friends! Finish!
Now it’s definitely the finish line!!
Several dozen more hours were spent on photography!
Endless experiments with light and settings. Hundreds of photographs.
In short - the finish!
The “quick build” that lasted almost a year and a half is over!
I already published a post yesterday about the completion of construction. But I had to delete it, because I didn’t like the photos I took at all! And, as you probably already guessed, I redid everything again! :laughing:





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Really pleased for you mate. The perfect model doesnt exist but you’ve gotten as close as it is reasonably possible to get on this. The best compliment I can give you is that I can spend a long time looking at this build and every time I do I see something else I really, really like.

Super work. Playing Devil’s Advocate here, but I would love to this exhaustive, no-holds barred approach on a more complicated subject (not necessarily a more complicated build) but one shows off the work you’ve done on it even better, to allow you more creativity and room to push the envelope. what do you have up next? Have you thought about it yet?

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A phenomenal endeavor and an exemplary finish. Best Of Show quality. Congratulations.

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I would like to add some thoughts regarding photographing a model.

As practice has shown, the optimal background will still be a white background. Colored backgrounds reflect their colored light onto the model. Therefore, they should not be used. It is desirable that the background be plastic and not paper. The plastic background additionally reflects light. It can be washed. In the photo it will be whiter than white paper, since white paper is not white either. From what I tried, everything had its own shade (blue or red), which can only be seen in the photo. Although, in fairness, it is worth noting that the plastic white photographic background is yellow when viewed through light! And in daylight it looks yellow on a horizontal surface, but fixed horizontally it looks white. Conclusion 21 - when photographing models, it is advisable to use a white plastic photographic background.

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Thank you, Matthew!!

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Thank you so much Chris!!

Yes! There are plans to continue assembling the T-34-76. The assembly itself is simple, without any frills. Out of the box. Considering that the model is 80% assembled (with the exception of tracks and road wheels). The difficulty will be the following - to make the model at least partially similar to the real prototype. Here I mean the task - to give the model the appearance of a real prototype (coloring and inscriptions). I won’t worry about the number of bolts and nuts.
I’ll start shortly.

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Continuation of thoughts on photography.Diaphragm.
This is also one of the key questions when photographing. Comparing dozens of my photos, I noticed that both high and low aperture values are not always justified. For example, with a wide open aperture (low f/number) there is no good detail, and the image quality is “below average”. When the aperture is closed (high aperture number), the foreground details are lost in image quality, but the background details become sharper and more readable. It turns out to be a kind of average option. With a very closed aperture (higher aperture number), the image quality of foreground details deteriorates, and background details become sharper, but the quality of the entire picture does not change much for the better. We must not forget about the subject of photography itself and its size. Is this a separate part, or is it an already assembled model? Based on my experience I will make several conclusions.

Conclusion 22 - when photographing small details or specific areas of the assembled model, the optimal aperture will be f/13-f/14 (intermediate values ​​between the main row f/11 - f/16) Although in the world it is believed that the maximum lens resolution is achieved at f/8-f/11.

Conclusion 23 - when photographing a fully assembled model, the f/16 aperture will be optimal.

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Lighting.

Another key component of a home photo studio (as, indeed, any other photo studio). Without the “right” lighting it is very difficult to take a good photo. Tested from my own experience. And here everything is complicated. Starting from the quality of the light source, its quantity, and its location. And here I still have a lot to learn. So far I have drawn the following conclusions for myself.

Conclusion 24 - there is no such thing as “too much” light. All light sources must have the same characteristics (except for power). Light needs to be constantly controlled (it is undesirable to shoot completely different scenes and objects with the same arrangement of light sources).

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Looking forward to hearing how it goes bud.

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